TV's Watershed Moment, with TVSquared

In 2020, as the world was on lockdown, consumers reignited an old relationship – with their TV, that is. Today, we’re joined by Bob Ivins and Jo Kinsella of TVSquared to discuss the rebirth of television, and what it means to advertisers. Bob and Jo explained why Direct-to-Consumer brands are turning to TV in droves and gave their opinions on when we might finally see fully-addressable TV ads.

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Marketing 2021: Trends and Predictions for the New Year

Now that 2020 has officially come to a close, marketers are hoping to move beyond the necessary survival mode tactics that challenged the world in the past year. Looking to the future is no easy task, however – despite the arrival of a new year, the lingering effects of 2020 will need to be taken into account as brands pivot to new strategies and tactics. Though planning for post-COVID-19 marketing has begun, the actual pandemic hasn’t ceased, and a continuing focus on digital will be necessary both now and later in the year. Likewise, the social justice and awareness initiatives that arose as direct responses to the unrest in 2020 must now become part and parcel of every successful marketer’s overall branding. The resources collected in this issue of Pulse share where marketers should focus their energies and advise how they can continue to adapt to the world’s present challenges.

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Pulse Issue 17

You Can't Go Home Again: A Return to Work Sites After COVID-19

May 2020

By Josch Chodakowsky, Senior Manager, Research & Innovation at Ask the Expert
By Josch Chodakowsky, Research Manager at Ask the Expert
Organizations have undergone unprecedented changes in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis. Businesses with the ability to do so have shifted to a work from home structure, which the firm Global Workplace Analytics forecasts may make up 25 to 30 percent of the workforce by 2021. But for many companies, productivity and essential tasks must be done in a physical office space. While it’s still uncertain when employees may return to their workplaces, it’s vital that leaders look into the precautions and adaptations that will be necessary in many cases to ensure the safety of their employees. The resources below discuss many of these coming possibilities.
Scores of white-collar employees have acclimated to working from home instead of the office as the coronavirus pandemic has altered daily rhythms across the world. Reopening dates for workplaces are not set in stone, but companies are still readying the office to welcome back employees in an age when having space is crucial. The changes are likely to include staggered workstations, sneeze guards, one-way corridors to minimize cross-traffic, and perhaps coming into the office only for group work.
For many, the toughest leadership test is now looming: how to bring a business back in an environment where a vaccine has yet to be found and economies are still reeling. This article suggests that in order to come back stronger, companies should reimagine their business model as they return to full speed. The moment is not to be lost: those who step up their game will be better off and far more ready to confront the challenges—and opportunities—of the next normal than those who do not. There are four strategic areas to focus on: recovering revenue, rebuilding operations, rethinking the organization, and accelerating the adoption of digital solutions.
Business perspectives on what it will take to shift from crisis mode are solidifying. U.S. finance leaders are focused on shoring up financial positions, as U.S. businesses head into a period of even more operational complexity while they orchestrate a safe return to the workplace. Back-to-work playbooks put workforce health first, as companies set course for a phased-in return to the workplace that will not be uniform across the U.S. or internationally. Returning employees and customers are going to experience a work environment that will differ in marked ways as a result.
A return to regular work is imminent for many employees across the world, as restrictions in place as part of the coronavirus response are reviewed. But a reintroduction to office life can be dangerous if mishandled. Businesses that fail to properly plan for this risk a fitful, fragile, and partial transition. CEOs planning to reintegrate back into their regular business premises need a plan that maintains safety, manages resources, and rebuilds morale. This resource shares seven essential considerations to ensure a successful transition back to work.
Data across 15 million square feet of global office space shows workplace use dropped more than 80 percent below historical averages in March as companies and their employees looked to flatten the COVID-19 curve. Corporate real estate leaders, facility executives, and workplace managers will need to continually prepare for radical fluctuations in employee usage throughout their response to the crisis.  As the worldwide emergency subsides, storefronts refill with consumers, and public transport resumes, we can expect a different workplace than the one we left behind. Here are four ways COVID-19 is changing the office space and the way we work.
We’re experiencing shifts in so many facets of life from family and community to work and how we socialize. While we may worry about the worst, a positive future is likely when considering what your company will do for you, how you will work with others, how your workplace and technology will change, how your company will modify its overall approaches, and even how you take advantage of career opportunities. The future will be bright—and there is cause for hope—in five key areas discussed here.
Are you an ANA member with a research request? Contact Ask the Expert to submit your question.

About ANA Marketing Futures

Knowing that marketers are increasingly challenged in their efforts to keep up with the latest trends and technologies, the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) tasked itself with creating a program designed to help marketers anticipate—and prepare for—the future of marketing.

 

ANA Marketing Futures is what emerged. With a focus on innovative topics and emerging trends, ANA Marketing Futures provides resources that will influence and inform via member cases, research studies, and insight from industry innovators. Check back often to learn about emerging trends and become inspired to take steps toward the growth of your business.

 

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