TV's Watershed Moment, with TVSquared

In 2020, as the world was on lockdown, consumers reignited an old relationship – with their TV, that is. Today, we’re joined by Bob Ivins and Jo Kinsella of TVSquared to discuss the rebirth of television, and what it means to advertisers. Bob and Jo explained why Direct-to-Consumer brands are turning to TV in droves and gave their opinions on when we might finally see fully-addressable TV ads.

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Marketing 2021: Trends and Predictions for the New Year

Now that 2020 has officially come to a close, marketers are hoping to move beyond the necessary survival mode tactics that challenged the world in the past year. Looking to the future is no easy task, however – despite the arrival of a new year, the lingering effects of 2020 will need to be taken into account as brands pivot to new strategies and tactics. Though planning for post-COVID-19 marketing has begun, the actual pandemic hasn’t ceased, and a continuing focus on digital will be necessary both now and later in the year. Likewise, the social justice and awareness initiatives that arose as direct responses to the unrest in 2020 must now become part and parcel of every successful marketer’s overall branding. The resources collected in this issue of Pulse share where marketers should focus their energies and advise how they can continue to adapt to the world’s present challenges.

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Pulse Issue 15

Hands Out of the Jar: Marketers Face a Cookie-Less Google

March 2020

By Josch Chodakowsky, Research Manager at Ask the Expert
By Josch Chodakowsky, Research Manager at Ask the Expert
Consumer privacy is at an ever-increasing pitch, and a plethora of ad blockers and similar apps have already handed consumers the power to control their online experiences, at least to a certain extent. GDPR, which requires websites to obtain consumer consent before tracking cookies, has further restricted marketers’ access to consumer data. The final blow came with the announcement that Google Chrome will eliminate third-party cookies completely by 2022 – something that other browsers have already done. While initially this jarring news left marketers wondering what to do next, it has also created new opportunities. The resources below discuss how marketers can adapt to a cookie-less diet.
New online-privacy rules and Google’s decision to end the use of cookies to target advertising could fuel even more interest by companies in partnering with influencers, because they preside over one of the biggest troves of direct audience information out there. Brands still want to know how their campaigns are doing, and want to make sure they’re connecting with the right audiences in compelling ways. That’s where influencer campaigns come in. The influencers themselves have access to the first-party data from their own followers, data they can legally share in aggregated, anonymized form for a specific campaign, with a specific brand. It can be a gold mine for smart companies. 
Loyalty programs existed long before personalization and one-to-one marketing bubbled up as buzzwords, but the emergence of fresh digital channels and evolving privacy regulations suggest they may become paramount to brands. Brands from Sephora to Red Lobster are revisiting their rewards strategies amid tighter ad-targeting restrictions and greater demands for data privacy.
Since Google said it would remove third-party cookies from its Chrome browser by 2022, advertisers have been in a bind: they need to find ways to replace the granular audience data they acquire from third-party cookies in order to continue to hit their monthly marketing targets. The predicament is prompting some advertisers to dust off old measurement techniques and increase their reliance on the platform companies that they have tried to keep at arm’s length — all in order to access more audience data.
Ad buyers aren’t thrilled about Google Chrome’s decision to phase out third-party cookies, but they’re thankful it’ll take about two years; Safari and Firefox didn’t extend such a courtesy. While some marketers and agencies see an opportunity to rebuild the digital advertising ecosystem off of a more secure infrastructure, others are anxious about losing their foundational tracking mechanism. This article presents four things the buy side is thinking about as they navigate through uncertain times.
Publishers and advertisers can benefit the most from Google doing away with third-party cookies — if they work it right. First-party data will be like gold within two years, when Google phases out third-party cookies on Chrome. “If entities with audiences are smart and willing to work together with their first-party data, they'll finally be able to mount a defense against the tri-opoly (Facebook, Google, and Amazon) and own their own destinies,” says Matt Keiser, founder and CEO of LiveIntent.
Are you an ANA member with a research request? Contact Ask the Expert to submit your question.

About ANA Marketing Futures

Knowing that marketers are increasingly challenged in their efforts to keep up with the latest trends and technologies, the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) tasked itself with creating a program designed to help marketers anticipate—and prepare for—the future of marketing.

 

ANA Marketing Futures is what emerged. With a focus on innovative topics and emerging trends, ANA Marketing Futures provides resources that will influence and inform via member cases, research studies, and insight from industry innovators. Check back often to learn about emerging trends and become inspired to take steps toward the growth of your business.

 

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