The Future of Work, with Russ Perry of Design Pickle

For the majority of the U.S. workforce, the past three months have been a complete paradigm shift in what’s considered “business as usual.” Millions of us are, for the first time in our careers, working entirely remotely, and brands across the country are scrambling to establish a “new normal.” But what if your entire workforce was remote to begin with? Marketing Futures spoke with Russ Perry, the founder of Design Pickle, a member of Inc.’s 500 fastest growing companies in 2019, about what it’s like to manage a staff of more than 400, of which only a small handful live and work in the company’s headquarter city of Scottsdale, Arizona. Russ discussed what the first few weeks of the COVID-19 crisis were like for Design Pickle, and shared advice for leaders looking to maintain creativity and camaraderie from afar.

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The Doctor Will Zoom You Now: Telehealth During COVID-19 and Beyond

Prior to the pandemic, adoption of virtual doctor visits was negligible (at just 11%, according to a McKinsey survey). Since social distancing and quarantine, however, those numbers have rocketed to 46 percent, and the comfort and ease both consumers and doctors are finding through telehealth, or telemedicine, indicate that it’s here to stay post-COVID. But the surge in telehealth begs the question: if some vital services like healthcare can be delivered virtually, what other traditionally physical industries may also find themselves delivering via cyberspace? For the moment, telehealth is ruling the space and the resources below discuss its growth, application, and future.

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Pulse Issue 15

Hands Out of the Jar: Marketers Face a Cookie-Less Google

March 2020

By Josch Chodakowsky, Research Manager at Ask the Expert
By Josch Chodakowsky, Research Manager at Ask the Expert
Consumer privacy is at an ever-increasing pitch, and a plethora of ad blockers and similar apps have already handed consumers the power to control their online experiences, at least to a certain extent. GDPR, which requires websites to obtain consumer consent before tracking cookies, has further restricted marketers’ access to consumer data. The final blow came with the announcement that Google Chrome will eliminate third-party cookies completely by 2022 – something that other browsers have already done. While initially this jarring news left marketers wondering what to do next, it has also created new opportunities. The resources below discuss how marketers can adapt to a cookie-less diet.
New online-privacy rules and Google’s decision to end the use of cookies to target advertising could fuel even more interest by companies in partnering with influencers, because they preside over one of the biggest troves of direct audience information out there. Brands still want to know how their campaigns are doing, and want to make sure they’re connecting with the right audiences in compelling ways. That’s where influencer campaigns come in. The influencers themselves have access to the first-party data from their own followers, data they can legally share in aggregated, anonymized form for a specific campaign, with a specific brand. It can be a gold mine for smart companies. 
Loyalty programs existed long before personalization and one-to-one marketing bubbled up as buzzwords, but the emergence of fresh digital channels and evolving privacy regulations suggest they may become paramount to brands. Brands from Sephora to Red Lobster are revisiting their rewards strategies amid tighter ad-targeting restrictions and greater demands for data privacy.
Since Google said it would remove third-party cookies from its Chrome browser by 2022, advertisers have been in a bind: they need to find ways to replace the granular audience data they acquire from third-party cookies in order to continue to hit their monthly marketing targets. The predicament is prompting some advertisers to dust off old measurement techniques and increase their reliance on the platform companies that they have tried to keep at arm’s length — all in order to access more audience data.
Ad buyers aren’t thrilled about Google Chrome’s decision to phase out third-party cookies, but they’re thankful it’ll take about two years; Safari and Firefox didn’t extend such a courtesy. While some marketers and agencies see an opportunity to rebuild the digital advertising ecosystem off of a more secure infrastructure, others are anxious about losing their foundational tracking mechanism. This article presents four things the buy side is thinking about as they navigate through uncertain times.
Publishers and advertisers can benefit the most from Google doing away with third-party cookies — if they work it right. First-party data will be like gold within two years, when Google phases out third-party cookies on Chrome. “If entities with audiences are smart and willing to work together with their first-party data, they'll finally be able to mount a defense against the tri-opoly (Facebook, Google, and Amazon) and own their own destinies,” says Matt Keiser, founder and CEO of LiveIntent.
Are you an ANA member with a research request? Contact Ask the Expert to submit your question.

About ANA Marketing Futures

Knowing that marketers are increasingly challenged in their efforts to keep up with the latest trends and technologies, the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) tasked itself with creating a program designed to help marketers anticipate—and prepare for—the future of marketing.

 

ANA Marketing Futures is what emerged. With a focus on innovative topics and emerging trends, ANA Marketing Futures provides resources that will influence and inform via member cases, research studies, and insight from industry innovators. Check back often to learn about emerging trends and become inspired to take steps toward the growth of your business.

 

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