The Future of Work, with Russ Perry of Design Pickle

For the majority of the U.S. workforce, the past three months have been a complete paradigm shift in what’s considered “business as usual.” Millions of us are, for the first time in our careers, working entirely remotely, and brands across the country are scrambling to establish a “new normal.” But what if your entire workforce was remote to begin with? Marketing Futures spoke with Russ Perry, the founder of Design Pickle, a member of Inc.’s 500 fastest growing companies in 2019, about what it’s like to manage a staff of more than 400, of which only a small handful live and work in the company’s headquarter city of Scottsdale, Arizona. Russ discussed what the first few weeks of the COVID-19 crisis were like for Design Pickle, and shared advice for leaders looking to maintain creativity and camaraderie from afar.

> See all episodes
The Doctor Will Zoom You Now: Telehealth During COVID-19 and Beyond

Prior to the pandemic, adoption of virtual doctor visits was negligible (at just 11%, according to a McKinsey survey). Since social distancing and quarantine, however, those numbers have rocketed to 46 percent, and the comfort and ease both consumers and doctors are finding through telehealth, or telemedicine, indicate that it’s here to stay post-COVID. But the surge in telehealth begs the question: if some vital services like healthcare can be delivered virtually, what other traditionally physical industries may also find themselves delivering via cyberspace? For the moment, telehealth is ruling the space and the resources below discuss its growth, application, and future.

> See all issues
Pulse Issue 14

Rock ‘Em Shop ‘Em Robots (In Retail)

February 2020

By Josch Chodakowsky, Research Manager at Ask the Expert
By Josch Chodakowsky, Research Manager at Ask the Expert
Artificial Intelligence has already rapidly advanced automation tools, and is now taking things a step further by moving into autonomy. The Robotic Industries Association (RIA) reported that North American robot sales increased 5.2 percent, compared to 2018.  And while robots have already been used behind the scenes in auto and fulfillment industries, we’re now ready to see them working alongside their human counterparts. The resources in this Pulse issue explore the presence of robots in the retail space, and what marketers can expect.
Robotics and artificial intelligence solutions that promise to solve several inventory and labor issues for retailers were touted at the National Retail Federation trade show, NRF 2020. The three biggest areas that robot vendors promised to solve fell around inventory tracking and shelf analytics (noticing when items were out of stock), planogram compliance (making sure that products were placed correctly on shelves to match a planned display), and price accuracy (making sure products have the right price on a shelf, but also to match online pricing). This article offers further takeaways from the show.
As retailers look to trim costs and streamline operations, particularly along the supply chain, robots are only going to become more entrenched in retail’s day-to-day operations, taking on greater roles and interacting with employees and consumers alike as AI becomes smarter. By 2025, more than 150,000 mobile robots will be deployed in brick-and-mortar retail establishments, according to an estimation by ABI Research.
Retail robots prove their worth daily as they gain credibility for helping grocers boost operational efficiencies through faster hazard detection and more fastidious inventory management. They’re capable of performing a variety of tasks, such as augmenting customer service and security teams while also checking on other aspects of store operations, including refrigeration, lighting, and security. Just like with any retail employee, training is required. But how do you train a retail robot? This discusses lessons learned while shepherding grocery robots as they’ve logged more than 250,000 miles of pilot runs and hundreds of actual deployments.
A survey by business process outsourcing firm Sykes Enterprises found that U.S. workers were less fearful of the age of automation than popularly portrayed. Some two-thirds of those surveyed drew a positive connotation with intelligent automation-related terminology. The survey consisted of 17 questions — ranging from how many people they know who have faced job loss due to automation, if any automation programs have saved them time at work this year, what they're doing to stay current with the changes in workplace tech, how their employers are preparing them for the future of work, and more. 
Robots are becoming an increasingly common sight in grocery stores and other large shops around the nation. Retailers often tell their customers that the robots are there to monitor for spills, broken glass, and other hazards. While that is true, it is only part of the story. The real driver behind retail robots is inventory management. It represents the perfect storm of data science, sensors, robotics, and the cloud.
Are you an ANA member with a research request? Contact Ask the Expert to submit your question.

About ANA Marketing Futures

Knowing that marketers are increasingly challenged in their efforts to keep up with the latest trends and technologies, the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) tasked itself with creating a program designed to help marketers anticipate—and prepare for—the future of marketing.

 

ANA Marketing Futures is what emerged. With a focus on innovative topics and emerging trends, ANA Marketing Futures provides resources that will influence and inform via member cases, research studies, and insight from industry innovators. Check back often to learn about emerging trends and become inspired to take steps toward the growth of your business.

 

Copyright © 2020 Association of National Advertisers-established in 1910

Contact

10 Grand Central

155 E 44th Street

New York, NY 10017

Phone: 212.697.5950

Email: marketingfutures@ana.net

 

marketingfutures.ana.net