The New Consumer Contract, with Erich Joachimsthaler of VIVALDI

Today’s guest is Erich Joachimsthaler, VIVALDI CEO and author of The Interaction Field (among others). Since his time at university, Erich has spent his career chasing the intangible value of a brand, far beyond sentimentality and logo recognition. In his latest book, Erich lays out the true intangible value brands can leverage — new digital business models that go beyond delivering great products and services. He shared why brands must enter into a new “Customer Contract” with consumers, one in which they work to solve problems faced by society, not the market.

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Light at the End of the Tunnel: How Dark Stores and Micro-Fulfillment Centers are Revolutionizing the Retail Supply Chain

As the well-worn proverb says, “necessity is the mother of invention,” the pandemic hit retail spaces particularly hard, pushing consumers to use ecommerce more as social and safety protocols increased. While there may be more stores open now, shoppers have found that the convenience and speed when ordering items online is invaluable even long after the protocols have gone.

To take advantage of this, retailers have turned parts or all of their spaces into “dark stores,” which act much the same way a warehouse or fulfillment center would. The opportunity then arises for retailers to not only leverage a wealth of direct consumer data from these types of transactions, but also provide greater personalization and localization services. This itself sets off a bevy of offers and angles from which to engage their customers.

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Pulse Issue 13

Foresight is 2020: Marketing Trends for the New Year

January 2020

By Josch Chodakowsky, Research Manager at Ask the Expert
By Josch Chodakowsky, Research Manager at Ask the Expert
A new year is an ideal time for reflection as well as anticipation of the changes that lie ahead in the marketing world. A new year allows marketers to evaluate what has been most successful in the past, honing in and perfecting what has worked and dropping what hasn’t to try and prepare for the unexpected new trends that will find their way into consumer’s and marketer’s laps. No prediction is perfect, but the resources below examine what marketers can anticipate in the year ahead, and analyze what didn’t work and what won’t work again.
Looking Ahead
Smart Insights explores key marketing trends based on examples and research on the adoption of the latest marketing techniques and technology marketers can use. They include six types of marketing: lifecycle, conversational, insights-driven, technology, consumer privacy or “Know Your Customer,” and digital transformation.
If you take the predictions of CMOs, 2020 will bring much of the same: more personalization, more environmental awareness, more experiential marketing, and more awareness of the possibilities—and responsibilities—that come with collecting and using data. To better understand what will be on top marketers’ minds across a range of industries in 2020, Forbes spoke with more than a dozen CMOs from a range of industries to have them share trends, goals, challenges, and opportunities that they think will be key in the year ahead.
ClickZ reported on a number of research firm Gartner’s 2020 marketing trend predictions, such as:
  • As consumers increasingly place their trust in known entities (family, friends, etc.), investments in influencer marketing will be undermined.
  • Marketers and advertisers are using artificial emotional intelligence (AEI) technologies to gather insights on users’ reactions to products and services.
  • Only 22% of marketers say they have in-depth insight into known customer values, but CMOs identify marketing and customer analytics as the capability most vital to supporting their marketing strategy.
  • 80% of marketers will abandon personalization efforts by 2025, due to lack of ROI.
  • Personalization now comprises 14% of the marketing budget, yet more than one in four marketers cite technology as a key obstacle to personalization.
In order to plan for 2020, you have to know how the marketing and consumer landscape is likely to change. Predicting marketing trends requires a combination of experience and the foresight to be able to see where all of this is headed. That’s a skillset today’s marketers need in order to keep up with the industry—to plan the tools you’ll need next year, the channels you’ll invest in, and the strategies you’ll rework from the ground up. Databox asked nearly 100 marketers to share what they’re preparing for.
And while we're at it, hindsight is...
Many of the predictions about what the future would look like in the 2010s have turned out, in hindsight, to be hilariously off the mark. It’s interesting to look at why that was, and how things played out instead. So, here are seven marketing and technology-related predictions from the 2010s that have aged pretty badly.
It’s easy to put on rose-colored glasses in December and predict a glorious future for one’s industry. But this is media, so it makes more sense to deliver some frank reminders about what’s not going to happen in 2020 instead. Digiday offers some looks at what’s not in store at the start of the next decade.
Are you an ANA member with a research request? Contact Ask the Expert to submit your question.

About ANA Marketing Futures

Knowing that marketers are increasingly challenged in their efforts to keep up with the latest trends and technologies, the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) tasked itself with creating a program designed to help marketers anticipate—and prepare for—the future of marketing.

 

ANA Marketing Futures is what emerged. With a focus on innovative topics and emerging trends, ANA Marketing Futures provides resources that will influence and inform via member cases, research studies, and insight from industry innovators. Check back often to learn about emerging trends and become inspired to take steps toward the growth of your business.

 

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