A Personalized Future, with Mike Barclay of MoEngage

Personalization in marketing is nothing new; since the dawn of the internet, brands have been able to customize messaging to specific groups or even individuals. However, we haven’t always used this engagement superpower for good. Many brands have been guilty of getting a little too personal and creeping out their customers in the process. But today’s guest says there’s a bright future for personalization as a cornerstone to modern marketing. Mike Barclay of MoEngage joined the pod to discuss the highs and lows of personalization, and what brands born before the dawn of the internet can do to get in on the personalization game.

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QR Codes: Are they Back for Real This Time?

QR Codes are an extension of the barcode, and were first introduced as a way for manufacturers to scan larger amounts of data quickly. By 2011, retailers and tradeshows were able to take advantage of smartphone technology to utilize QR codes in their inventories, badging, and check-ins — and slowly there emerged consumer usage in the form of online offers.
The process, however, was clunky and involved third-party app software to get QR Codes to work. Fast forward to 2020, when the COVID-19 pandemic raged, and the need for contactless interaction became paramount. It was during this time that QR Code technology could now exist on everything from packaging to OOH signage, and with a simple hover of a smartphone’s camera send consumers to microsites, check-in pages, and offers.
This has allowed marketers to take advantage of QR Codes in ways previously unthought of; however, like most technologies, there are privacy and safety issues to be aware of — and the current speed and ease of QR Code usage means large untapped potential for marketers in the future as well. Read on to see how marketers are using them and addressing issues with QR Codes.

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Pulse Issue 11

The Claw IS the Law: Alcohol Trends Leading up to 2020

November 2019

According to drinks market analysts ISWR, global alcohol consumption has declined by 1.6 percent, especially in sectors such as wine and beer. Spirits and other specialty drinks are on the rise, however, and IWSR actually predicts 5 percent growth in the industry over the next three years. The takeaway? Like in so many other industries, disruptors are embracing change and taking over markets that have grown stale with sameness – and they’re doing so at a time when consumers are both seeking and facing constant change. Read on to discover more about these disruptor brands and shifting consumer trends in the alcohol space.
Analysts predict that the hard seltzer market will quintuple in size to $2.5 billion by 2021. All that is impressive, but the real standout stat is that about 75 percent of the segment’s 200 percent growth in the past year has come from just one month: July of 2019. So the question in this edition of AdRoll’s Unrolling is: how did the White Claw brand erupt out of nowhere to create a movement?
Almost every major brewer and spirits producer has jumped onto the hard seltzer production game. Not only are they popular with a large portion of the Millennial market, but these types of drinks appeal to consumers across ethnic categories.
Beverage Dynamics’ 2019 State of the Industry Survey painted a diverse picture. Some topics consumers and brands aligned on: the use of cans; the popularity of brown spirits and rosé wine; a slowdown in craft beer; premium everything; the rise of tequila; Ready-to-Drink (RTDs); private label; single-barrel; “healthy” alcohol; and the ubiquity of Tito’s vodka.
Thanks to a few legal loopholes (along with some recent legal wins) online alcohol brands such as Haus, Empathy Wines, and One/Vodka (owned by Pernod Ricard) are beginning to create a new growth playbook using D2C tactics.
Millennials spend less money on alcohol than previous generations, according to a NerdWallet analysis of a 2017 Bureau of Labor Statistics' Consumer Expenditure Survey. In an attempt to win millennials over, some brands are marketing their alcohol as wellness drinks, from "wellness beers" meant for athletes, to paleo-friendly and keto-friendly natural wines. An artisanal mezcal brand, which calls its alcohol a "clean spirit," claims one ingredient can regulate mood, act as a natural anti-depressant, and improve overall sexual well-being.
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About ANA Marketing Futures

Knowing that marketers are increasingly challenged in their efforts to keep up with the latest trends and technologies, the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) tasked itself with creating a program designed to help marketers anticipate—and prepare for—the future of marketing.

 

ANA Marketing Futures is what emerged. With a focus on innovative topics and emerging trends, ANA Marketing Futures provides resources that will influence and inform via member cases, research studies, and insight from industry innovators. Check back often to learn about emerging trends and become inspired to take steps toward the growth of your business.

 

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