Worldbuilding - The Future of Storytelling, with Wild Card

In an age where consumer attention spans are at an all-time low, something curious is happening: under the right circumstances, consumers are spending hours - even days - immersed in lush fictional worlds such as Harry Potter, Game of Thrones, and The Avengers. However, world building isn't just for blockbuster entertainment franchises. When executed well, brands can create immersive worlds of their own, significantly driving brand loyalty in the process. We spoke with Tara Deveaux and Shawn Shahani of Wild Card about a new study on world building and consumer behavior. They shared what marketers could learn from Hollywood producers, and gave tips on creating a world of engagement around your brand.

> See all episodes
You Can't Go Home Again: A Return to Work Sites After COVID-19

Organizations have undergone unprecedented changes in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis. Businesses with the ability to do so have shifted to a work from home structure, which the firm Global Workplace Analytics forecasts may make up 25 to 30 percent of the workforce by 2021. But for many companies, productivity and essential tasks must be done in a physical office space. While it’s still uncertain when employees may return to their workplaces, it’s vital that leaders look into the precautions and adaptations that will be necessary in many cases to ensure the safety of their employees. The resources below discuss many of these coming possibilities.

> See all issues
Pulse Issue 7

Honey, I Shrunk the Data

July 2019

Big Data revolutionized marketing with the sheer volume of consumer insights that could be gleaned from massive data sets. For years this has aided marketers in their targeting and campaign design. While big data works fantastically on large consumer groups and demographics, it lacks the ability to understand and then target the individual with personalized information more reflective of the actual buyer. Enter small data, which takes the giant store of data collected and makes it easier to analyze, act upon, and uncover consumer trends. The resources here discuss how to successfully use small data, both on its own and in concert with big data.
As we reach the point where most forward-looking businesses have “digitally transformed” and successfully used the vast amount of data to their advantage, the foundation is shaking. Interestingly enough, the main factors driving this change are the consumers providing much of the data, and the technology that has made use of it. This examines each of these elements, and the path forward for businesses to use data in the best way possible.
Marketers strive to design customer experiences that leave lasting impressions, drive conversions, and keep customers coming back for more. But do they rely too heavily on big data instead of honing in on the specific actions that drive customer engagements? A Forrester survey found that nearly a third of digital marketers rely completely on big data.
Big Data is created in untold ways – transactions, clicks, IoT devices, etc. Small Data is gathered through primary research. This paper from Vision Critical unpacks what each of these buzzwords means and outlines why it’s important to use both to really understand your customer.
Big Data is created in untold ways – transactions, clicks, IoT devices, etc. Small Data is gathered through primary research. This paper from Vision Critical unpacks what each of these buzzwords means and outlines why it’s important to use both to really understand your customer.
In the drive to harness data to scale and enhance customer relationships, companies are beginning to question whether the customer has been lost along the way. Instead of truly listening to the voice of the customer, respondents say they often face data paralysis and resort to making decisions based on assumptions. While there isn’t an easy solution, some believe it begins with making big data smaller.
This explores the potentials of small data, which holds a fortune that marketers may have overlooked. It looks at the things companies are not able to find to truly know what their consumers want or the little things they do — their culture, religious affiliations — on a small scale.
Are you an ANA member with a research request? Contact Ask the Expert to submit your question.

About ANA Marketing Futures

Knowing that marketers are increasingly challenged in their efforts to keep up with the latest trends and technologies, the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) tasked itself with creating a program designed to help marketers anticipate—and prepare for—the future of marketing.

 

ANA Marketing Futures is what emerged. With a focus on innovative topics and emerging trends, ANA Marketing Futures provides resources that will influence and inform via member cases, research studies, and insight from industry innovators. Check back often to learn about emerging trends and become inspired to take steps toward the growth of your business.

 

Copyright © 2020 Association of National Advertisers-established in 1910

Contact

10 Grand Central

155 E 44th Street

New York, NY 10017

Phone: 212.697.5950

Email: marketingfutures@ana.net

 

marketingfutures.ana.net