Worldbuilding - The Future of Storytelling, with Wild Card

In an age where consumer attention spans are at an all-time low, something curious is happening: under the right circumstances, consumers are spending hours - even days - immersed in lush fictional worlds such as Harry Potter, Game of Thrones, and The Avengers. However, world building isn't just for blockbuster entertainment franchises. When executed well, brands can create immersive worlds of their own, significantly driving brand loyalty in the process. We spoke with Tara Deveaux and Shawn Shahani of Wild Card about a new study on world building and consumer behavior. They shared what marketers could learn from Hollywood producers, and gave tips on creating a world of engagement around your brand.

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You Can't Go Home Again: A Return to Work Sites After COVID-19

Organizations have undergone unprecedented changes in the wake of the COVID-19 crisis. Businesses with the ability to do so have shifted to a work from home structure, which the firm Global Workplace Analytics forecasts may make up 25 to 30 percent of the workforce by 2021. But for many companies, productivity and essential tasks must be done in a physical office space. While it’s still uncertain when employees may return to their workplaces, it’s vital that leaders look into the precautions and adaptations that will be necessary in many cases to ensure the safety of their employees. The resources below discuss many of these coming possibilities.

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Pulse Issue 6

They Were... Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Micro-Influencing Trendies

June 2019

Others motivating consumers to buy products is far from a new concept: from family and friends, celebrities, mascots, ambassadors, and spokespeople, all have contributed to the success of product sales and awarenessWith the ubiquity of social media, “influencers” have become the nom du jour for these groups. For years, celebrities and users with millions of followers (macro-influencers) have held court; however, a saturation point has arrived to make way for a new class: micro-influencers, who have a smaller group of followers but a more loyal pre-existing fan base to share. Read on to see how micro-influencers are changing social marketing and how you can use them.
Uproar found that 72% of consumers prefer micro-influencers, with 68% making purchases based on their posts, an indication that micro-influencers have a large influence over their followers. It found that 51% percent of respondents’ favorite non-celebrity influencers had less than 30,000 followers, with 30% having less than 10,000. Micro-influencers play an important and growing role in the influencer marketing space as marketers look to narrow targeting for maximum impact.
The advantage of working with micro-influencers are their highly targeted audiences; even if you’re reaching fewer, you’re reaching the right ones – those genuinely interested in your products or services and have a bigger chance of taking action based on your campaign and buying from you. This article defines micro-influencers, looks at different types and benefits, as well as how to choose the right ones.
Marketing guru Seth Godin notes that marketing on a large scale can sacrifice what makes you special in the first place. Instead of going big, he says, businesses should look for "the smallest viable audience" of fans, and build a meaningful and dedicated community around them. This looks at why social media isn't meant to target the masses, why you should speak to people who are in your "tribe", and how you can get better results by partnering with micro-influencers.
Modern-day versions of influencer marketing include nano-influencers (influencers with between 1,000 and 5,000 followers) and micro-influencers (influencers with between 2,000 and 100,000 followers) on digital platforms. However, why exactly are these types of influencers becoming more popular and sought after by big brands? It’s all about the authenticity of these influencers and the engagement they conjure.
Marketers find it difficult to gauge basic details of influencer arrangements; things like logistics (when and where), scale (how often) and, most importantly, payment (how to and how much) pose a constant challenge to traditional marketers who just don’t know how to fit this new model into their old ways of working. This looks at every level of influencer, their details, and how much they’re typically compensated.
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About ANA Marketing Futures

Knowing that marketers are increasingly challenged in their efforts to keep up with the latest trends and technologies, the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) tasked itself with creating a program designed to help marketers anticipate—and prepare for—the future of marketing.

 

ANA Marketing Futures is what emerged. With a focus on innovative topics and emerging trends, ANA Marketing Futures provides resources that will influence and inform via member cases, research studies, and insight from industry innovators. Check back often to learn about emerging trends and become inspired to take steps toward the growth of your business.

 

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